Character development essay outline

The causal character development essay outline of a plot can be thought of as a series of sentences linked by “and so”. In the narrative sense, the term highlights the important points which have important consequences within the story, according to Ansen Dibell.

The first event is causally related to the third event, while the second event, though descriptive, does not directly impact the outcome. A story orders events from beginning to end in a time sequence. Teri Shaffer Yamada agrees that a plot does not include memorable scenes within a story which do not relate directly to other events but only “major events that move the action in a narrative. Rose climbs on the railing at the front of the ship and spreads her hands as if she’s flying, this scene is memorable but does not directly influence other events, so it may not be considered as part of the plot.

Han Solo is frozen in carbonite. A tornado picks up a house and drops it on a witch, a little girl meets some interesting traveling companions, a wizard sends them on a mission, and they melt a witch with a bucket of water. A fabula is the events in the fictional world, whereas a syuzhet is a perspective of those events. This definition is usually used in narratology, in parallel with Forster’s definition. He also believed that the events of the plot must causally relate to one another as being either necessary or probable. Acts are connected by two plot points or turning points, with the first turning point connecting Act I to Act II, and the second connecting Act II to Act III. A plot must have, Aristotle says, a beginning, a middle, and an end, and the events of the plot must causally relate to one another as being either necessary or probable.

Of the utmost importance to Aristotle is the plot’s ability to arouse emotion in the psyche of the audience. Aristotle’s work on comedy has not survived. He illustrates this with the question of a tragic character who is about to kill someone in his family. Next after this comes the actual perpetration of the deed meditated.

A better situation than that, however, is for the deed to be done in ignorance, and the relationship discovered afterwards, since there is nothing odious in it, and the discovery will serve to astound us. In 1863, Gustav Freytag, a German writer, advocated a model based upon Aristotle’s theory of tragedy. This is now called “Freytag’s pyramid,” which divides a drama into five parts, and provides function to each part. The first phase in Freytag’s pyramid is the exposition, which introduces the characters, especially the main character, also known as the protagonist. It shows how the characters relate to one another, their goals and motivations, as well as their moral character. During the exposition, the protagonist learns their main goal and what is at stake.

Rising action is the second phase in Freytag’s five-phase structure. It starts with a conflict, for example, the death of a character. The inciting incident is the point of the plot that begins the conflict. It is the event that catalyzes the protagonist to go into motion and to take action.

Rising action involves the buildup of events until the climax. In this phase, the protagonist understands his or her goal and begins to work toward it. Smaller problems thwart their initial success and their progress is directed primarily against these secondary obstacles. This phase demonstrates how the protagonist overcomes these obstacles.

The climax is the turning point or highest point of the story. The protagonist makes the single big decision that defines not only the outcome of the story, but also who they are as a person. Freytag defines the climax as the third of the five dramatic phases which occupies the middle of the story. At the beginning of this phase, the protagonist finally clears away the preliminary barriers and engages with the adversary.

Usually, both the protagonist and the antagonist have a plan to win against the other as they enter this phase. For the first time, the audience sees the pair going against one another in direct or nearly direct conflict. This struggle usually results in neither character completely winning or losing. In most cases, each character’s plan is both partially successful and partially foiled by their adversary. The central struggle between the two characters is unique in that the protagonist makes a decision which shows their moral quality, and ultimately decides their fate.

In a tragedy, the protagonist here makes a poor decision or a miscalculation that demonstrates their tragic flaw. According to Freytag, the falling action phase consists of events that lead to the ending. Character’s actions resolve the problem. In the beginning of this phase, the antagonist often has the upper hand.

The protagonist has never been further from accomplishing their goal. The outcome depends on which side the protagonist has put themselves on. In this phase the protagonist and antagonist have solved their problems and either the protagonist or antagonist wins the conflict. A plot device is a means of advancing the plot in a story. It is often used to motivate characters, create urgency, or resolve a difficulty. An example of a plot device would be when the cavalry shows up at the last moment and saves the day in a battle.

Facebook Comments